2018 Past Exhibitions

January 25 - March 24: "Michael Bidner: Raw" & "If You've Got It, Flaunt It"

Michael Bidner: Raw
Curated by Jason Dickson
January 25, 2018 - March 24, 2018
Opening Reception: Thursday January 25, 7-9 PM

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Image: Michael T. Bidner, Fleet of Colombus, 1972, collage. Collection of McIntosh Gallery, gift of the Stephen Joy Estate, 2002.

Michael Bidner (1944-1989) worked predominantly in multiples and mail art yet, despite being a pioneer in these media, he remains largely absent from the art narrative of both London Ontario and Canada. Michael Bidner: Raw aims to redress this obscurity by presenting the first retrospective of his work, restoring him to a visible place in the narrative of late 20th century Canadian art and counterculture.

Bidner was well acquainted with his era’s movements of printmaking, mail art, and xerography, taking visual cues from the world of commercial art, the literary press, the gay community (what is now known as the LGBT2Q+ community), and the London punk scene. He famously acquired the first colour Xerox machine in Canada directly from the company itself and went on to host an all night print party in the basement of McIntosh Gallery.

He published what could arguably be called one of the most beautiful zines produced in Canada. Adz — “magazine as art,” in Bidner's words — was a more than a magazine, it was a hypermagazine. It was extreme, bold, irregular, and hilarious. His later publications, Rag, a rich example of gay (LGBT2Q+) activism in print, and RUDE were equally ambitious.

Throughout his short career, Michael Bidner created an extraordinary and dynamic body of work that foreshadowed later developments in alternative culture. His innovative work in the gay (LGBT2Q+) community, as well as the fringe communities of DIY print production, continue to resonate in current artistic practices, making his invisibility in the national scene all the more conspicuous.

Bidner produced work at the bleeding edge of technology and cultural significance and the time has come to examine and celebrate his many prescient accomplishments.

For more information contact Mitra Shreeram, Communications and Outreach Coordinator at mshreera@uwo.ca or 519.661.2111 ext. 87576


If You've Got It, Flaunt It
Michele Pearson Clarke, Thirza Cuthand, Allyson Mitchell and Christina Zeidler, Mr. Mrs. Keith Murray, Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay, Coral Short, Vivek Shraya, and Danny Welsh
Curated by Lucas Cabral
January 25 - March 24, 2018
Opening Reception: Thursday January 25, 7-9 PM

Fucshia by Dany Welsh

Image: Danny Welsh, Fuchsia, 2015, photograph. Courtesy the artist.

Queer people exist in opposition. With the goal of catching and “correcting” our identity, we often survey our mannerisms, physical attributes, and other traits that define us at the “other”.  Such self-realization and self-regulation are among the earliest stages of recognized difference. As we grow as individuals and develop pride in the performative aspects of our identity, we live more boldly in the world.

Queer artists, equipped with resilience and a tradition of reclaiming and redefining performance, analyze, channel, emphasize, hyperbolize, and satirize. The resulting performances are intrinsically unique and subjective. By putting themselves, their characters, their roles, their self-reflections and self-realizations in their work, the artists in this exhibition in celebrating their queerness, enhance the discourses surrounding queer identity within the context of a heteronormative culture.  

If You’ve Got It Flaunt demonstrates the array of potential identities available within the LGBT2Q+ community. Standing their ground by asserting and diversifying queer visibility, the exhibiting artists reveal the complex, shifting nuances of intersectionality based on their lived experience and aspirations for the future.

For more information contact Mitra Shreeram, Communications and Outreach Coordinator at mshreera@uwo.ca or 519.661.2111 ext. 87576

April 5 - May 28: "The Flora and Ian Tripp Collection" & "Recent Acquisitions"

The Flora and Ian Tripp Collection: Art, Friends, and Memories
Curated by Catherine Elliot Shaw
April 5, 2018 - May 26, 2018
Opening Reception: Saturday April 8, 2-4 PM

Roly Fenwick

Image: Roly Fenwick Lilacs (On the Road to Big Bay) 1996, The Flora and Ian Tripp Collection (promised gift to McIntosh Gallery)

This exhibition reveals one London couple’s approach to assembling an art collection based largely on longstanding friendships with the artists. Encouraged by former McIntosh director, Maurice Stubbs, Ian and the late Flora Tripp began collecting art soon after their arrival in London in the 1960s. They attended exhibition openings and often acquired a key work of art from each show, often the one illustrated on the invitation.

Over the decades, they added international works discovered on their travels. But it largely remained a collection of London artists and friends including Eric Atkinson, Roly Fenwick, and Maurice Stubbs. 
The Flora and Ian Tripp Collection: Art, Friends, Memories displays most of their collection publically for the first time in celebration of its future bequest to McIntosh GalleryWe thank Paula, Tim and the late Greg Child, for their generous financial support of this exhibition.


Recent Acquisitions
Curated by Catherine Elliot Shaw
April 5, 2018 - May 26, 2018
Opening Reception: Saturday April 8, 2-4 PM

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Image: Henry Moore (British, 1898-1986), Family Group, 1945, bronze. Collection of McIntosh Gallery, Western University. Gift of the Estate of Shirley Elizabeth Moore (S. Elizabeth Moore), 2017

Since 2010 collectors from London and region have donated over 550 works of art to the McIntosh Gallery Collection. Most have enhanced in significant ways our existing holdings of Canadian artists such as Carl Beam, Greg Curnoe, Jamelie Hassan, and Norval Morrisseau. Some are the only representations of fine local artists like the outstanding and beautiful James Griffiths. Works by distinguished international artists, including Richard Hamilton, Marino Marini, and an exceptionally rare and early Henry Moore bronze, help situate Canadian art practices within a global context.

McIntosh Gallery thanks all of our generous donors who make it possible for us to collect, maintain, preserve and develop a permanent collection. A rich resource for the promotion and appreciation of local, regional and national artists, it is widely recognized for its unique holdings which are featured regularly in curated exhibitions across Canada and in prestigious publications. 

For more information contact Abby Vincent, Communications and Outreach Coordinator at avince5@uwo.ca  or 519.661.2111 ext. 87576

June 8 - June 30: "Welcome to Detroit: Suzy Lake and Orlando Ford" & "A Human Laboratory"

Welcome to Detroit: Suzy Lake and Orlando Ford
Curated by Jessica Cappuccitti
June 8, 2018 - June 30, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday June 8, 7-9 pm

Image: Suzy Lake, 1093 Seyburn Avenue, 1915, 2014/2016, photograph, courtesy of Georgia Scherman Projects.

Welcome to Detroit: Suzy Lake and Orlando Ford includes photographs by Lake and a film by Ford that ask what it means for a city to be observed, documented and perceived by outsiders. Lake’s series, Performing an Archive, examines the cycle of ruin and revitalization in the Detroit working-class neighbourhoods where she grew up.
Ford’s film, Where the Heart Is, tells a vibrant, human tale of a growing city through candid interviews with Detroit residents. 

About the curator

From Newmarket, Ontario, Jessica Cappuccitti holds a BA Hons. from Western University, and MFA from OCAD University. Currently a doctoral candidate in the Department of Visual Arts at Western University, Welcome to Detroit: Suzy Lake and Orlando Ford is her thesis exhibition.

For more information contact Abby Vincent, Communications and Outreach Coordinator at avince5@uwo.ca or 519.661.2111 ext. 87576


A Human Laboratory
Mark Kasumovic
June 8, 2018 - June 30, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday June 8, 7-9 pm

Image: Mark Kasumovic, Gloves (Freshwater Research Laboratory), 2016, photograph, courtesy of the artist.

Featuring over one hundred photographs from visits to more than thirty-five laboratories, research centres, and field stations around the world, Mark Kasumovic’s A Human Laboratory proposes many possible, yet unresolved, narratives.
Photographing scientific instruments, Kasumovic suggests their similarity to the camera as influential recording devices that enhance our understanding of the contemporary social landscape.

About the artist

From Hamilton, Ontario, Mark Kasumovic holds a BFA from Ryerson University, an MFA from NSCAD University. Currently a doctoral candidate in the Department of Visual Arts at Western University, A Human Laboratory is his thesis exhibition.

For more information contact Abby Vincent, Communications and Outreach Coordinator at avince5@uwo.ca or 519.661.2111 ext. 87576